bashlyk

EnglishEdit

A bashlyk

EtymologyEdit

From Russian башлык (bashlyk), from Turkish başlık.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bashlyk (plural bashlyks)

  1. A protective cone-shaped hood with lappets for wrapping around the neck, used especially by Turks and Cossacks.
    • 1962, Henri Troyat, Daily Life in Russia Under the Last Tsar, page 123
      In winter the troops wore the grey greatcoat and the bashlyk, a sort of hood protecting the neck and ears.
    • 1968, Jacob Neusner, A History of the Jews in Babylonia, page 102
      The description of Jews wearing very high hats ("as tall as themselves" or "an amah high") calls to mind the tall pointed cap, or hood bashlyk brought by the Iranians from the Siberian steppes. The bashlyk occurs with great frequency among the Medean and Persian tribes.
    • 1983, E. Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, volume 3(1), page 303
      The obverse bust wears a completely new style of bashlyk, resembling the Macedonian kausia, but with a flap at the back and an eagle on top.
    • 2007, Ferdinand Ossendowski, Beasts, Men and Gods, page 89
      Then one of the strangers mounted the throne, where he took off his bashlyk or cap-like head covering. All of the Lamas fell to their knees as they recognized the man who had been long ago described in the sacred bulls of Dalai Lama, Tashi Lama and Bogdo Khan.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "bashlyk." Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster. 2002.
Last modified on 19 May 2013, at 20:47