Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 00:56

batiste

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From French batiste, a form of Baptiste, of disputed origin (“according to Littré and Scheler from the alleged original maker, Baptiste of Cambray; according to others, from its use in wiping the heads of children after baptism” – OED).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

batiste (uncountable)

  1. A fine cloth made from cotton or linen; cambric.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 104
      Clad in a Persian-Renaissance gown and a widow's tiara of white batiste, Mrs Thoroughfare, in all the ferment of a Marriage-Christening, left her chamber on vapoury autumn day and descending a few stairs, and climbing a few others, knocked a trifle brusquely at her son's wife's door.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 88:
      He had started to stroke her, shivering, staring ahead, following with a blind man's hand the dip of her spine through the batiste.

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

NounEdit

batiste f

  1. plural form of batista

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

batiste

  1. Informal second-person singular () preterite indicative form of batir.