Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 01:01

bearer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

bear +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bearer (plural bearers)

  1. One who, or that which, bears, sustains, or carries.
    • Bible, 2 Chron. ii. 18
      Bearers of burdens.
    • Dryden
      The bearer of unhappy news.
  2. Someone who helps carry the coffin or a dead body during a funeral procession; pallbearer.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  3. One who possesses a cheque, bond, or other notes promising payment.
    I promise to pay the bearer on demand.
  4. (India, dated) A domestic servant or palanquin carrier.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, ‘Watches of the Night’, Plain Tales from the Hills, Folio 2005, p. 60:
      The bar of the watch-guard worked through the buttonhole, and the watch—Platte's watch—slid quietly on to the carpet; where the bearer found it next morning and kept it.
  5. A tree or plant yielding fruit.
    a good bearer
  6. (printing) A strip of reglet or other furniture to bear off the impression from a blank page.
  7. (printing) A type or type-high piece of metal interspersed in blank parts to support the plate when it is shaved.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

beārer

  1. first-person singular imperfect passive subjunctive of beō