beclap

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English biclappen, equivalent to be- +‎ clap.

Alternative formsEdit

  • beclapp

VerbEdit

beclap (third-person singular simple present beclaps, present participle beclapping, simple past and past participle beclapped)

  1. To grasp, insnare, ensnare, catch, to trap suddenly, to grab suddenly.
    • 1605, Tourneur, Worldes Folly:
      He so besmouched her, and she so beclapped him, and there tumbling together, as merrie as they would wish, I sighed to thinke, what a supper they would haue after break-fast.

Etymology 2Edit

be- +‎ clap

VerbEdit

beclap (third-person singular simple present beclaps, present participle beclapping, simple past and past participle beclapped)

  1. To clap for.
    • 1886, in The Nation, volume 43, page 414:
      No one is so beclapped as the author of a popular drama bowing over his own footlights; the artists and romancers of the daily press are modester than they themselves would be willing to admit.
    • 1891, in Littell's living age, volume 191, page 260:
      In the course of his table-talk, during the French war, the ex-chancellor once remarked that, though the Prussian people huzza'd and beclapped their great Frederick when alive, []
    • 1903, in New outlook (Alfred Emanuel Smith), volume 74, page 936:
      He who has loved quiet, who has so long shunned publicity, must school himself to be cheered and beclapped and huzzaed by thousands every time he lets himself be seen.
Last modified on 19 May 2013, at 21:14