Last modified on 26 May 2014, at 16:47

beclose

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English beclosen, biclosen, alteration (due to Middle English closen) of earlier biclusen, from Old English beclȳsan (to close, shut what is open, conclude, put an end to, shut up in a place, enclose, confine, imprison, shut out, exclude), equivalent to be- +‎ close. See also cluse.

VerbEdit

beclose (third-person singular simple present becloses, present participle beclosing, simple past and past participle beclosed)

  1. (transitive) To shut up or in; enclose; enwrap.
    • 1994, Edward Peter Nolan, Cry out and write: a feminine poetics of revelation:
      It is our sensuality in which he is enclosed, and our kyndely [natural] substance is beclosed [beclosed, wrapped up] in Jesus Christ, with the blessed soul of Christ sitting in rest in the godhead.
    • 2003, Julian (of Norwich), Julia Bolton Holloway, Showing of love:
      He is our clothing that for love, wraps us, embraces us, and all becloses us, for tender love that he may never leave us, being to us all thing that is good as to my understanding.
  2. (transitive) To imprison.