beglory

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From be- (on, at, across, about) +‎ glory.

VerbEdit

beglory (third-person singular simple present beglories, present participle beglorying, simple past and past participle begloried)

  1. (transitive) To glory in, about, or over; exult; make glorious; impart with glory; glorify.
    • 1880, George Heath, James Badnall, Francis Redfern, The poems of George Heath:
      Away on the patriarch mountains the sunset is burning, And huge floating cloudlets, begloried with crimson, Move silently o'er with a sleepy and peace-breathing motion.
    • 1898, William Morris, Poetical Works: Tale of Beowulf:
      [...] And with victory beglory'd set Sun and Moon, [...]
    • 1918, James Edward McCulloch, Democracy in earnest:
      Let city commissions and chambers of commerce be as careful about ridding their own cities of disease and crime as they are to get into them factories and conventions and whatever else begets or beglories gold.
    • 1961, Jay Broadus Hubbell, Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes, American literature:
      [...] into the Century Ensuing with a third less shine Of Light and Life to th'Entery Of the next fearfull woe which in its time Should follow to beglory Truth Divine.
    • 2011, Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme:
      Isaac Rosenberg acutely condemned Rupert Brooke's 'begloried sonnets' for their reliance on 'second-hand phrases'.
Last modified on 17 June 2013, at 02:10