Last modified on 10 August 2014, at 22:40

being

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originated 1250–1300 from Middle English being; see be + -ing.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

being

  1. Present participle of be.

NounEdit

being (plural beings)

  1. A living creature.
  2. The state or fact of existence, consciousness, or life, or something in such a state.
    • Shakespeare
      Claudius, thou / Wast follower of his fortunes in his being.
  3. (philosophy) That which has actuality (materially or in concept).
  4. (philosophy) One's basic nature, or the qualities thereof; essence or personality.
  5. (obsolete) An abode; a cottage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
    • Steele
      It was a relief to dismiss them [Sir Roger's servants] into little beings within my manor.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

being

  1. (obsolete) Given that; since.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, New York Review Books 2001, p. 280:
      ’Tis a hard matter therefore to confine them, being they are so various and many [...].

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • being” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • being” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • "being" in the Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary (Beta Version), K Dictionaries limited, 2000-2006.
  • "being" in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit