beration

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

beration (uncountable)

  1. (rare, perhaps nonstandard) Beratement: the act of berating.
    • 1983, Lynsey Stevens, Forbidden Wine,[1] Harlequin Books, ISBN 9780373106547, page 8:
      However, this self-beration had little effect on her eyes as, with a will of their own, they touched on the curve of his lips.
    • 1992 February 12, Lisa J. Gilmore, "Re: Oh, you sweet thing", in bit.listserv.words-l, Usenet:
      Seems that there are two Lisa's out there... Lisa 1, Please acknowledge. This is Lisa G. We'll have to keep ourselves straight. I'm not involved in the beration or phone sex thing.
    • 1999, Farid Esack, On Being a Muslim: Finding a Religious Path in the World Today,[2] Oneworld, ISBN 9781851681464, page 53:
      There are a few things that I have always found helpful when I am reflecting upon where I am, without it degenerating into a futile exercise in narcissistic navel-gazing or self-beration.
    • 2000 November 14, "Al" (username), "Re: first concert [ot] but who cares", in alt.music.savage-garden, Usenet:
      now before the mass beration for slating a religion could I just say, 'who the f...'s Jesus?'
    • 2009, Jacques Khalip, Anonymous Life: Romanticism and Dispossession,[3][4] Stanford University Press, ISBN 9780804758406, page 163:
      Writing in a post-Waterloo culture that repudiated the trappings of usurping authority and revolutionary time, Austen depicts Sir Walter as the perfect example of a subject born out of ressentiment, affectively retreading the ground of the past with an impotent self-beration that props up his calcified sense of prestige.
    • 2009 January 31, "ldnayman" (username), "Re: serial killers pinball", in rec.games.pinball, Usenet:
      See..my constant beration has paid off!

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Last modified on 17 June 2013, at 19:09