Last modified on 17 August 2014, at 10:37

biceps

See also: bíceps

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Biceps brachii; the biceps of the arm.

EtymologyEdit

From Latin biceps (double-headed, two peaked), from bis (double) + caput (head).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

biceps (plural biceps or bicepses)

  1. (anatomy) Any muscle having two heads.
    • 1901, Michael Foster & Lewis E. Shore, Physiology for Beginners‎, page 73
      The leg is bent by the action of the flexor muscles situated on the back of the thigh, the chief of these being called the biceps of the leg.
  2. Specifically, the biceps brachii, the flexor of the elbow.
    • 1996, Robert Kennedy & Dwayne Hines II, Animal Arms‎, page 21
      The arm muscles are the show muscles of the physique. When someone asks to "see your muscles," they are most likely referring to your arms, and more specifically, your biceps.
  3. (informal) The upper arm, especially the collective muscles of the upper arm.
    • 1964 Dec, “Muscles are His Business”, Ebony‎, volume 20, number 2, page 147: 
      Today, Stonewall's flexed biceps measure 18 inches around.
    • 2005, Lisa Plumley, Once Upon a Christmas‎, page 144
      Biting her lip, she held his biceps for balance and waded farther.
  4. (prosody) A point in a metrical pattern that can be filled either with one long syllable (a longum) or two short syllables (two brevia)
    • 1987, Martin Litchfield West, Introduction to Greek Metre
      Also it is advisable to distinguish this ( ˘ ˘ ) — ˘ ˘ — rhythm, where the princeps was probably shorter in duration than the biceps (as in the dactylic hexameter), from true (marching) anapaests, in which they were equal.
    • 2000, James I. Porter, Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future, page 347
      This means that in the metrical sequence [] recited in ordinary speech rhythm, the princeps occupied a slightly shorter time than the biceps (5:6), and if a long syllable was used to fill the biceps it had to be dragged a little []

Usage notesEdit

  • Now often mistaken as a plural form; see bicep. An archaic plural bicipites, borrowed from the Latin, also exists.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin biceps (two-headed).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbi.sɛps/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bi‧ceps

NounEdit

biceps m (plural bicepsen, diminutive bicepsje n)

  1. (anatomy) biceps; any two-headed muscle
  2. the biceps brachii
    • 2007, C. A. Bastiaanssen, Anatomie en Fysiologie‎, page 387
      De biceps en de triceps zijn elkaars antagonisten.
      The biceps and the triceps are each other's antagonist.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

French Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Latin biceps (double-headed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

biceps m (plural biceps)

  1. (anatomy) biceps (any two-headed muscle)
  2. the biceps brachii
    • 1978, Freddy Buache, Cinéma Anglais, page 154
      Mais Bronson se définit uniquement par son physique (biceps, démarche souple) et non par la densité de sa présence ce qui limite ses possibilités d'emploi.
      But Bronson is defined only by his physique (biceps, supple gait) and not by the density of his presence which limits his employment possibilities.

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

aquila biceps (double-headed eagle)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bis (double) + caput (head).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

biceps m, f, n (genitive bicipitis); third declension

  1. double-headed, having two heads
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.65
      Iane biceps, anni tacite labentis origo
      Two-headed Janus, source of the quietly passing year
  2. (of mountains) having two summits or peaks
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 2.221
      ardet in inmensum geminatis ignibus Aetne
      Parnasosque biceps et Eryx et Cynthus et Othrys
      Aetna blazes in immense doubled flames
      and twin-peaked Parnasus and Eryx, Cynthus and Othrys
  3. (of swords) double-edged
  4. divided into two parts

InflectionEdit

Third declension, neuter nominative singular like masculine/feminine.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative biceps biceps bicipitēs bicipitia
genitive bicipitis bicipitis bicipitium bicipitium
dative bicipitī bicipitī bicipitibus bicipitibus
accusative bicipitem biceps bicipitēs bicipitia
ablative bicipitī bicipitī bicipitibus bicipitibus
vocative biceps biceps bicipitēs bicipitia

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

Biceps

EtymologyEdit

From Latin biceps (two-headed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

biceps m

  1. biceps brachii

DeclensionEdit

QuotationsEdit

  • 1970, Stanisław Lorentz, Walka o Dobra Kultury, Warszawa 1939-1945, Volume 2, page 27
    I właśnie wtedy przyszło mi na myśl uratowanie prasy powstańczej, którą bardzo troskliwie zbierałem do 2 września, to jest do dnia podpalenia naszego domu, a jednocześnie dnia, kiedy zostałem ranny w prawy biceps.
  • 1994, Związek Literatów Polskich, Dialog: Miesięcznik Poświęcony Dramaturgii Współczesnej, page 13
    Podwija rękaw i napina starczy biceps.
    LEO: Dziękuję, stąd widzę.
    STARZEC (klepie się po bicepsie): Niebywałe!
    He [Starzec] rolls up his sleeve and tenses elderly biceps.
    LEO: Thanks, I see it from here.
    STARZEC (taps himself on the biceps): Unheard of!

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French, Latin biceps (two-headed).

NounEdit

biceps m

  1. biceps; any two-headed muscle
  2. the biceps brachii

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin biceps (two-headed).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bǐtseps/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧ceps

NounEdit

bìceps m (Cyrillic spelling бѝцепс)

  1. biceps

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • biceps” in Hrvatski jezični portal