Last modified on 17 June 2013, at 20:26

bioneer

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

A portmanteau of biological and pioneer or engineer, possibly coined by Kenny Ausubel.[1]

NounEdit

bioneer (plural bioneers)

  1. (neologism) A biological pioneer, an inventer of environmental solutions and biotechnology; a crafter of creative solutions to environmental and socio-cultural problems.
    • 2009, Gary D. Libecap, Frontiers in Eco-Entrepreneurship Research (ISBN: 184855950X), page 140:
      A high environmental impact of an industry significantly reduces the likelihood of a firm to be classified as a bioneer or ecopreneur.
  2. (chiefly science fiction) A biological engineer, an engineer of creatures, especially partially artificial/mechanical ones.
    • 2002, Trent Jamieson, Garry Nurrish, Redsine 7 (ISBN 1894815009), page 13:
      Beneath the coat, a metal frame of gears and levers and wheels: living bone, tendon, sinew holding it together. A bioneer’s wet dream.

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

bioneer (third-person singular simple present bioneers, present participle bioneering, simple past and past participle bioneered)

  1. (neologism) To pioneer biologically.
    • John Logan, NASA physician, at the Space Frontier Foundation's "New Space Return to the Moon Conference" (2006): Panel SFF1484 at 1:15:25: "The only thing you can truly say, and I think this is a very safe statement, is if you can't figure out how to bioneer, bioneer with a b, you're not going anywhere."
  2. (chiefly science fiction) To engineer biologically.
    • 1975, Thomas F. Monteleone, in Dystopian visions (edited by Roger Elwood), page 3:
      Lost beneath her abundant flesh was a vestigial skeleton which floated disconnected and unmoving in a gelatinous sea. Her bioneered organs were swollen to immense proportions and hundreds of liters of blood pumped through her extensive circulatory system.
    • 2002, Trent Jamieson, Garry Nurrish, Redsine 7 (ISBN 1894815009), page 11:
      Devon scowled. "This is clever bioneering. A muttie that dies before it lives."
    • 2002, L. E. Modesitt, jr, The Octagonal Raven (ISBN 0812570081), page 90:
      [] an open space that would not have been possible a millennium earlier, before the development of sophisticated bioneering.
    • 2007, Peter Jay Shippy, How to build the ghost in your attic: a book-length poem, page 21:
      The cows were bioneered
      so urbs could have fresh milk, laced
      with graces — vitamins and serums conveyed in compact, pet-like packages. Even their shit is boutiqued. It falls in uniform pellets and smells like Zen.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Utne Reader (1999 March-April), "15 Ideas That Could Shake the World"; retrieved on 2007-03-20