Last modified on 29 May 2014, at 02:04

birdly

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bird +‎ -ly.

AdjectiveEdit

birdly (comparative birdlier or more birdly, superlative birdliest or most birdly)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of birds; avian.
    • 1850, Thomas Lynch, Memorials of Theophilus Trinol, student:
      Truth for the bird his eye discerns; By birdly hope his wing is strong; And full delight in birdly good; Makes utterance for itself in song.
    • 1916, John Rose, Poems: dedicated in loving memory to my boy Chester:
      "Nay, nay," quoth Luxury, "I laugh at thee, — Thou art the king of beasts and I of birds ; Men are of beastly and of birdly kind, But more are birdly and obedience show Only to me, for in their bosom nursed Caprice and Vanity which are my slaves [...]
    • 2002, John Hanson Mitchell, Following the sun: a bicycle pilgrimage from Andalisia to the Hebrides:
      And in the birdly mind (actually in the birdly gonads), spring begins on their winter grounds with the increasing sunlight, as early as February.