Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 14:47

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic.

VerbEdit

birl (third-person singular simple present birls, present participle birling, simple past and past participle birled)

  1. (Scotland) To spin.
    • 1893, Robert Louis Stevenson, Catriona, Chapter XXII: Helvoetsluys,
      About nine in the morning, in a burst of wintry sun between two squalls of hail, I had my first look of Holland - a line of windmills birling in the breeze.
    • 1906, Neil Munro, The Vital Spark, reprinted in 1958, Para Handy Tales,
      "I'll maybe no trouble you long, boys," he moaned lugubriously. "My heid's birling roond that fast that I canna even mind my own name two meenutes."
  2. To cause a floating log to rotate by treading on it.
    • 1903 April, Stewart Edward White, The Riverman, published in McClure's Magazine, Volume 20,
      "That's nothing!" my companion repressed me, "anybody can birl a log. Watch this."
      Roaring Dick for the first time unfolded his arms. With some appearance of caution he balanced his unstable footing into absolute immobility. Then he turned a somersault.

NounEdit

birl (plural birls)

  1. (music, bagpipes) A type of grace note movement that quickly switches between low-A and low-G several times, producing a low rippling sound. [1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ www.mcnabbs.org - Introduction to Bagpipe Music

Etymology 2Edit

See birle.

VerbEdit

birl (third-person singular simple present birls, present participle birling, simple past and past participle birled)

  1. Alternative form of birle