birse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Scots birse ("bristle, hair").

NounEdit

birse (plural birses)

  1. (Scotland) bristle

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

birse (plural birses)

  1. bristle, hair
  2. sheaf, plume (of bristles)
  3. beard
  4. anger, temper
Derived termsEdit
  • birsies (bristles) (diminutive)
  • pit the birse up (to make angry or ill-tempered)
  • whirl o birse (the ace of spades)

VerbEdit

tae birse (third-person singular simple present birses, present participle birsin, simple past birsed, past participle birsed)

  1. to put a bristle on
  2. to flare up, get angry
Derived termsEdit
  • birsie (bristly, hairy; hot-tempered, passionate; of the weather: keen, sharp; difficult)
  • birsed-ends (a shoemaker's thread)

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

birse (plural birses)

  1. (medicine) bruise
  2. pressure

VerbEdit

tae birse (third-person singular simple present birses, present participle birsin, simple past birsed, past participle birsed)

  1. to bruise
  2. to push, press, squeeze
Derived termsEdit
  • birse ben a bit (move along a bit)
  • birse tae (push to)
Last modified on 4 December 2013, at 13:11