Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 23:00

blake

See also: Blake

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English blak, blac (pale), from Old English blāc (pale, pallid, wan, livid; bright, shining, glittering, flashing) and Old Norse bleikr (pale; white, fair); both from Proto-Germanic *blaikaz (pale; shining), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlē- (to shimmer, glow). Compare Scots bleg (light, drab). More at bleak.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

blake (comparative blaker or more blake, superlative blakest or most blake)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England) Pale; wan; sallow; yellow.

Etymology 2Edit

From the Middle English blāken, the northern reproduction (the form in the south was blōken, whence the verb bloke) of the Old English blācian (to become pale), from blāc (shining”, “white”, “pale).

VerbEdit

blake (third-person singular simple present blakes, present participle blaking, simple past and past participle blaked)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) Become pale.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

blake

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of blaken

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English blæc.

AdjectiveEdit

blake

  1. black

DescendantsEdit