Last modified on 27 August 2014, at 15:57

boodie

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant of body.

NounEdit

boodie (plural boodies)

  1. Obsolete spelling of body.

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

boodie (plural boodies)

  1. (Scotland) A hobgoblin.[1]

Etymology 3Edit

From Nyunga burdi.[2]

NounEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

boodie (plural boodies)

  1. (Australia) A species of bettong, Bettongia lesueur.
    • 1968, Vincent Serventy, Wildlife of Australia, page 34,
      However, the boodie, once common over much of southern Australia, is now only found in numbers on offshore islands on the mid-west coast. Boodies are sociable animals and since they dig burrows, considerable warrens can be formed.
    • 1985, Australia's Amazing Wildlife, page 304,
      The bettongs live in moderately dry country and with the exception of the Boodie, which digs burrows, all make nests of grass on the ground.
    • 2002, C. R. Veitch, Michael Norman Clout (editors), Turning the Tide: the Eradication of Invasive Species: Proceedings of the International Conference on the Eradication of Island Invasives, page 224,
      The work on Boodie Island was the first attempt in Australia to eradicate black rats in the presence of a threatened, non-target mammal. [] It is likely that as many as 200-300 boodies now inhabit the island.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002. http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com (17 Aug 2011)
  2. ^ boodie” in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press, accessed 2012 September 12.