Last modified on 22 May 2014, at 20:53

boots and all

EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

boots and all (not comparable)

  1. Used other than as an idiom: see boots,‎ and all.
    • 1869 May 29, A Soldier's Shoes, in E. S. Dallas (editor), Once a Week: January-July 1869, page 435,
      He would scarcely desire to sleep in them, as was said of Suwarrow, the famous Russian general, who, even in time of peace, slept fully armed, boots and all, prepared for any emergency ; and who used to say that when he was lazy and wished to enjoy a comfortable sleep, he usually took off one spur.
    • 2011, Gail Isaacson, My Incredible Animals, page 83,
      So into the South Fork I dove, boots and all, the boots weren't too neat as they filled with water, but I made it to the log, went under the water, got hold of Jody's collar and started back towards the river bank.
  2. (chiefly Australia) Without reserve, with no holds barred; totally, completely.
    • 2010, Peter Kocan, The Fable of All Our Lives, unnumbered page,
      So Mike felt he had to jump in boots and all with this new article, and he used his own non-Anglo heritage to bolster his point.