Last modified on 22 November 2014, at 14:54

bowse

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bousen, from Middle Dutch būsen, buisen, buysen (to drink heavily). Related to Middle High German būsen (to swell, inblow). More at beer.

VerbEdit

bowse (third-person singular simple present bowses, present participle bowsing, simple past and past participle bowsed)

  1. (archaic) To drink excessively and socially; to carouse.
    • 1819, John Keats, "Lines on the Mermaid Tavern":
      O generous food! / Dressed as though bold Robin Hood, / Would, with his maid Marian, / Sup and bowse from horn and can.

NounEdit

bowse (plural bowses)

  1. A carouse; a drinking bout; a booze.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

VerbEdit

bowse (third-person singular simple present bowses, present participle bowsing, simple past and past participle bowsed)

  1. (nautical) To haul or hoist (something) with a tackle.