Last modified on 17 June 2013, at 23:08

bowse

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch busen.

VerbEdit

bowse (third-person singular simple present bowses, present participle bowsing, simple past and past participle bowsed)

  1. (archaic) To drink excessively and socially.
    • 1819, John Keats, "Lines on the Mermaid Tavern":
      O generous food! / Dressed as though bold Robin Hood, / Would, with his maid Marian, / Sup and bowse from horn and can.

NounEdit

bowse (plural bowses)

  1. A carouse; a drinking bout; a booze.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

VerbEdit

bowse (third-person singular simple present bowses, present participle bowsing, simple past and past participle bowsed)

  1. (nautical) To haul or hoist (something) with a tackle.