bulbophile

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

bulb +‎ -phile

NounEdit

bulbophile (plural bulbophiles)

  1. A person who is obsessed with bulb plants.
    • 1884, "Hardy Flowers", Journal of Horticulture and Practical Gardening, 24 July 1884:
      To those who know it not I may say the flowers are nearly an inch across, like golden stars, the colour being deep yellow, with a medial brown nerve to each perianth division. They last a long time in beauty, and are to one bulbophile at least very attractive.
    • 1888, "Lycoris Radiata and Aurea", The Gardeners' Chronicle, 11 February 1888:
      Perhaps some bulbophile can show us how easy they are to flower "when one knows how."
    • 1890, W. E. Endicott, "The Newer Gladioli", Popular Gardening, October 1890:
      This year, some of the catalogues offered varieties of this strain, and those of us who are bulbophiles, and who, with appetites whetted by last year's glowing descriptions, were eagerly watching to see these transcendent productions burst into view on the commercial horizon, were promised that we should have bulbs (for consideration) that should produce flowers five inches across in the greatest profusion, which would withstand the fiercest sunshine and the heaviest rain without injury.
    • 1988, The Garden, Volume 113, page 52:
      Richard Nutt, M.A., F.I.C.E., is a widely travelled engineer, amateur botanist and bulbophile, whose particular interest is the genus Galanthus.
    • 1997, Charles Hardman, "Book Reviews", Herbertia, Volume 52, page 203:
      Bulbophiles definitely should consider experimenting with this unique approach to groundcover under their bulbous plants.
    • 2000, Shelley Gonzales, "The Drama of Tulips Poised to Burst With Color", Rocky Mountain News, 8 April 2000:
      Roehm's fascination with these fancy flowers is shared by many bulbophiles, []
Last modified on 14 October 2012, at 23:29