camomile

EnglishEdit

camomile

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, first attested 1265, from Old French camomille, from Latin chamaemelon, from Ancient Greek χαμαίμηλον (khamaímêlon, earth-apple), from χαμαί (khamaí, on the ground) + μῆλον (mễlon, apple). So called because of the apple-like scent of the plant.

NounEdit

camomile (plural camomiles)

  1. Composite plant with a fragrance reminiscent of apples:
    1. Matricaria recutita (formerly known as Matricaria chamomilla), German chamomile or Hungarian chamomile, with fragrant flowers used for tea, and as an herbal remedy.
    2. Chamaemelum nobile (formerly Anthemis nobilis), English chamomile or Roman chamomile, a ground cover with fragrant foliage.
  2. Any of several other similar plants. (See below)
  3. Short for a camomile tea, an herbal tisane made from camomile blossoms.

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Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 07:23