Last modified on 16 September 2014, at 06:40
See also: carè, caré, and çare

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English care, from Old English caru, ċearu (care, concern, anxiety, sorrow, grief, trouble), from Proto-Germanic *karō (care, sorrow, cry), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵār-, *gÀr- (voice, exclamation). Cognate with Old Saxon cara, kara (concern, action), Middle High German kar (sorrow, lamentation), Icelandic kör (sickbed), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐍂𐌰 (kara, concern, care). Related also to Dutch karig (scanty), German karg (sparse, meagre, barren). See chary.

NounEdit

care (countable and uncountable, plural cares)

  1. (obsolete) Grief, sorrow.
  2. Close attention; concern; responsibility.
    Care should be taken when holding babies.
    • Shakespeare
      I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
  3. Worry.
    I don't have a care in the world.
  4. Maintenance, upkeep.
    dental care
  5. The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession).
  6. The state of being cared for by others.
    in care
  7. The object of watchful attention or anxiety.
    • Spenser
      Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1925, Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera, silent movie
    ‘Have a care, Buquet—ghosts like not to be seen or talked about!’

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English caren, carien, from Old English carian (to sorrow, grieve, be troubled, be anxious, to care for, heed), from Proto-Germanic *karōną (to care), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵār-, *gÀr- (voice, exclamation). Cognate with Middle High German karn (to complain, lament, grieve, mourn), Alemannic German karen, kären (to groan, wheeze, give a death rattle), Swedish kära (to fall in love), Icelandic kæra (to care, like), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐍂𐍉𐌽 (karōn, to be concerned).

VerbEdit

care (third-person singular simple present cares, present participle caring, simple past and past participle cared)

  1. (intransitive) To be concerned about, have an interest in.
    I don't care what you think.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, The Unknown Ajax:
      And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.
    • 2012 May 27, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992)”, The Onion AV Club:
      This newfound infatuation renders Bart uncharacteristically vulnerable. He suddenly has something to care about beyond causing trouble and makes a dramatic transformation from hell-raiser to gentleman about town.
  2. (intransitive) To look after.
    Young children can learn to care for a pet.
  3. (intransitive) To be mindful of.
  4. Polite or formal way to say want.
    Would you care for another slice of cake?
    Would you care to dance?
Usage notesEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

care

  1. first-person singular present indicative of carer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of carer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of carer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of carer
  5. second-person singular imperative of carer

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

care f pl

  1. feminine plural of caro

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

carē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of careō

AdjectiveEdit

cāre

  1. vocative masculine singular of cārus

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin qualis.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

care

  1. which
    Care din aceste jocuri este nou? - Which of these games is new?

InflectionEdit

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Nom/Acc all numbers
all genders
care
Gen/Dat singular plural
masculine & neuter feminine all genders
cărui cărei căror

PronounEdit

care

  1. which, that, who
    El este un om care a văzut foarte multe lucruri. - He is a man who has seen very many things.

VenetianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

care f

  1. feminine plural of caro