Last modified on 9 November 2014, at 14:30

cearu

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *karō (care, sorrow, cry), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeh₂r- (to shout, call) (compare Latin garriō (chatter) and Old Irish gairid (call). Cognate with Old Saxon kara, Old High German chara (grief), Old Norse kǫr (sickbed), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐍂𐌰 (kara). Related to ċeariġ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ċearu f (nominative plural ċeare)

  1. suffering, sorrow, grief
    • The Wanderer, ll. 8–9:
      Oft iċ sċeolde āna ūhtna gehwylċe / mīne ċeare cwīþan
      Often I had alone to speak of my trouble each morning before dawn.
  2. anxiety
  3. care, caution
    • Beowulf, ll. 1303–04:
      Ċearu wæs ġenīwod / ġeworden in wīcum
      Care had been renewed in the dwellings.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit