Last modified on 13 August 2014, at 11:10

changer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

change +‎ -er

NounEdit

changer (plural changers)

  1. Someone or something who changes things.

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually used together with another noun, eg, automatic tool changer, shape changer, mind changer

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French changier, from Late Latin cambiāre, from Latin cambīre, present active infinitive of cambiō (exchange, barter), from Gaulish cambion, *kambyom (change), from Proto-Celtic *kambos (twisted, crooked), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ḱambos, *(s)kambos (crooked). Cognate with Italian cambiare, Occitan cambiar, Portuguese cambiar, Romanian schimb, Spanish cambiar and Walloon candjî.

VerbEdit

changer

  1. (transitive) to exchange (something)
  2. (transitive) to change (money, a job, one's circumstances etc.)
  3. (transitive) to change, alter (something en into)
  4. (intransitive) to change
  5. (pronominal) to change (one's clothes), get changed

ConjugationEdit

  • This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written change- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

changer

  1. Alternative form of changier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. In addition, g becomes j before an a or an o to keep the /dʒ/ sound intact. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.