Last modified on 23 May 2014, at 20:23

chawnce

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

chawnce (plural chawnces)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of chance.
    • 1920, Various, Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, May 5, 1920[1]:
      "Very well, Sergeant," said Chippo meekly; "it'll give me a chawnce to make my complaint to the orficer."
    • 1914, Various, Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, March 11, 1914[2]:
      The onlookers thought that Mrs. Trudge was about to take her innocent offspring to the House of Commons, and those out of hat-pin range murmured, "Shime," "Give the kids a chawnce."
    • 1913, Elizabeth Robins, The Convert[3]:
      Only they 'aven't got a fair chawnce even to agitate fur their rights.
    • 1903, Burt L. Standish, Frank Merriwell at Yale[4]:
      It's the only chawnce they have had to cheer.