chick

EnglishEdit

A baby chicken (chick), Gallus gallus domesticus

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English chike, variation of chiken (chicken), from Old English ċicen, cycen (chicken). Sense of "young woman" first attested in Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis (1927) [1]. More at chicken.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chick (plural chicks)

  1. (zoology) A young bird.
  2. A young chicken.
  3. (slang) (Discuss(+) this sense) A woman (especially one who is young and/or attractive).
    Three cool chicks / Are walking down the street / Swinging their hips — song "Three Cool Cats" by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
    • 1927, Sinclair Lewis, Elmer Gantry:
      He had determined that marriage now would cramp his advancement in the church and that, anyway, he didn't want to marry this brainless little fluffy chick, who would be of no help in impressing rich parishioners.
    • 2004, Tess Pendergrass, Bad moon rising‎:
      I can't believe you've got a hot chick in that ratty apartment with you.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

chick (third-person singular simple present chicks, present participle chicking, simple past and past participle chicked)

  1. (obsolete) To sprout, as seed does in the ground; to vegetate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chalmers to this entry?)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Etymology of chick in Online Etymology Dictionary
Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 17:35