Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 21:12

chimerical

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From chimera, from Latin chimaera, from Ancient Greek χίμαιρα (khímaira, she-goat). This term entered English around 1638.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɪˈmɛɹɪkəl/

AdjectiveEdit

chimerical (comparative more chimerical, superlative most chimerical)

  1. Of or pertaining to a chimera.
  2. Being a figment of the imagination; fantastic (in the archaic sense).
    • 1877, Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet
      "Yes; I have a turn both for observation and for deduction. The theories which I have expressed there, and which appear to you to be so chimerical, are really extremely practical—so practical that I depend upon them for my bread and cheese."
    a chimerical goal
  3. Inherently fantastic; wildly fanciful.
  4. Resulting from the expression of two or more genes that originally coded for separate proteins.

TranslationsEdit

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Derived termsEdit