Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 16:04

citified

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

citified

  1. simple past tense and past participle of citify

AdjectiveEdit

citified (comparative more citified, superlative most citified)

  1. Characteristic of the sophisticated customs or dress associated with city life.
    • 1794, quoted in 2009, Gordon S. Wood, Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815,
      New York is less citified than Philadelphia.
    • 1922, University of Chicago Dept of Education, The Elementary school journal, Volume 23,
      It was not much more citified than it was countrified.
    • 1928, The Mimes of the Courtesans (English translation of a work by Lucian):
      Isn't he handsome? Isn't he a man of the world? Isn't he citified?
    • 1931, Russell Lord, Men of Earth, 1975 reprint edition, American Farmers and the Rise of Agribusiness,
      As the countryside becomes more and more citified and farming more and more specialized, motorized and businesslike, I suppose that the farmer's mental scope and habits will become more like mine.
    • 1943, Ann Chidester, No longer fugitive, page 215:
      But he's citified and holds his cup just right and never has to think about it.
    • 1982, Robert John Smith, Ella Lury Wiswell, The Women of Suye Mura,
      She is a citified young woman, and the more citified people are the more difficult it is to ask and get answers to personal questions.