cliffing

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

cliffing (uncountable)

  1. the formation of cliffs
    • 2005, Maurice L. Schwartz, Encyclopedia of coastal science, Springer, page 613:
      Cliffing of this kind is repaired if there is an abundant supply of sediment to restore the profile, permitting mangroves to spread again, but if there is a sediment deficit a mangrove cliff will persist and recede until the mangrove terrace has been completely removed.
    • 2006, K. Bharatdwaj, Physical Geography: Hydrosphere, Discovery Publishing House, page 157:
      When the alternate bands of hard and soft rock dip upstream in the longitudinal course of the river and if the caprock is resistant the underlying soft rocks are eroded more rapidly due to cliffing and thus the resistant rock beds form precipituous wall-like scarps which allow the river water to fall downstram vertically and ultimately a stupendous waterfall is formed.
    • 2011, Eric C. F. Bird, Coastal Geomorphology: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons:
      Cliffing (scarping) of the seaward margins of coastal dunes and the absence of new fore dunes (or the formation of new fore dunes lasting at most a few years) is very widespread around the world’s coastline, a consequence of the modern prevalence of beach erosion (Figure 9.2).

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 2 March 2012, at 23:13