Last modified on 16 July 2014, at 14:03

close of play

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

close of play (uncountable)

  1. (cricket) The end of a day's play
  2. (tennis) The end of the final game (not to be confused with set or match) during a day at the All England Tennis Championships (Wimbledon)
  3. (idiomatic) The end of the working day
    • 2005, Karin Knorr-Cetina, Alex Preda, “Managing Dispersed”, in The sociology of financial markets[1], ISBN 9780199275595, page 246:
      In fact, in our global financial institution, close of play was taken to be 1615 EST with all subsequent trades going on to the next day
    • 2006, Martin Richardson, “Delegation and Coaching”, in The People Management Clinic: Answers to Your Most Frequently Asked Questions[2], ISBN 9781854183910, page 120:
      Ask yourself this question: If you delegate, will the task be done: [...] Sooner (completing the task earlier, e.g. this project will finish close of play Thursday if I delegate; if I do not, close of play Friday)
    • 2008, Edward Docx, Pravda[3], ISBN 9780618534401, page 119:
      Your mother can be buried at the Smolensky graveyard on Vadilevsky, which is, I understand, in accordance with her wishes. That’s official as of close of play today.

SynonymsEdit