Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 22:15

cochlear

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

AdjectiveEdit

cochlear (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Of or pertaining to the cochlea.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

cochlea (snail”, “snail-shell) +‎ -ar (suffix forming neuter nouns)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cochlear n (genitive cochleāris); third declension

  1. a spoon
  2. a spoonful (as a measure for liquids)
    1. (specifically, in medicine and pharmacy) a spoonful (a measurement of dose, equal to half a cheme or ¹⁄₁₄₄ of a cotyla)

DeclensionEdit

Third declension neuter "pure" i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cochlear cochleāria
genitive cochleāris cochleārium
dative cochleārī cochleāribus
accusative cochlear cochleāria
ablative cochleārī cochleāribus
vocative cochlear cochleāria

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cŏclĕar (cochl-) in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • cŏchlĕăr et cŏchlĕāre” on page 332/3 of Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • “coc(h)lear(e)” on page 341/1 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • “cochlearis (mascul.)” on page 194/2 of Jan Frederik Niermeyer’s Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (1976)