cohort

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin cohors (stem cohort-), perhaps via Old French cohorte.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkəʊ.hɔː(ɹ)t/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkoʊ̯.hɔɹt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: co‧hort

NounEdit

cohort (plural cohorts)

  1. A group of people supporting the same thing or person.
  2. (statistics) A demographic grouping of people, especially those in a defined age group, or having a common characteristic.
    The 18-24 cohort shows a sharp increase in automobile fatalities over the proximate age groupings.
  3. (military, history) Any division of a Roman legion, normally of about 500 men.
    Three cohorts of men were assigned to the region.
    • 1900, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Evelyn Shuckburgh (translator), Letters to Atticus, 5.20,
      But he lost the whole of his first cohort and the centurion of the first line, a man of high rank in his own class, Asinius Dento, and the other centurions of the same cohort, as well as a military tribune, Sext. Lucilius, son of T. Gavius Caepio, a man of wealth, and high position.
    • 1910, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Last of the Legions,
      But here it is as clear as words can make it: 'Bring every man of the Legions by forced marches to the help of the Empire. Leave not a cohort in Britain.' These are my orders.
    • 1913, Cornelius, article in Catholic Encyclopedia,
      The cohort in which he was centurion was probably the Cohors II Italica civium Romanorum, which a recently discovered inscription proves to have been stationed in Syria before A.D. 69.
  4. An accomplice; abettor; associate.
    He was able to plea down his sentence by revealing the names of three of his cohorts, as well as the source of the information.
  5. Any band or body of warriors.
    • Milton
      With him the cohort bright / Of watchful cherubim.
  6. (botany) A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.
  7. A colleague.

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 04:44