colonial

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From colony +‎ -al

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colonial (comparative more colonial, superlative most colonial)

  1. Of or pertaining to a colony.
  2. Of or pertaining to a period when a country or territory was a colony.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52: 
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
  3. (US) Of or relating to the original Thirteen Colonies of the USA.
  4. (US) Of or relating to the style of architecture prevalent at about the time of the Revolution.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

colonial (plural colonials)

  1. A person from a country that is or was controlled by another.
  2. (US) A house that is built in a style reminiscent of the period of the colonization of New England.

TranslationsEdit

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Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colonial m, f (masculine and feminine plural colonials)

  1. colonial

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colonial m (feminine coloniale, masculine plural coloniaux, feminine plural coloniales)

  1. colonial

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colonial m, f (plural coloniais; comparable)

  1. colonial

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colonial m, f (plural coloniales)

  1. colonial
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 13:55