Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:41

combine

See also: Combine and combiné
See also: combiné

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French combiner, from Late Latin combīnāre, present active infinitive of combīnō (unite, yoke together), from Latin com- (together) + bīnī (two by two).

PronunciationEdit

Verb

Noun

VerbEdit

combine (third-person singular simple present combines, present participle combining, simple past and past participle combined)

  1. (transitive) To bring (two or more things or activities) together; to unite.
    • John Dryden
      You with your foes combine, / And seem your own destruction to design.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      So sweet did harp and voice combine.
    • 2012 March 1, William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter, “The British Longitude Act Reconsidered”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 87: 
      Conditions were horrendous aboard most British naval vessels at the time. Scurvy and other diseases ran rampant, killing more seamen each year than all other causes combined, including combat.
    Combine the milk and the hot water in a large bowl.   I'm combining business and pleasure on this trip.
  2. (transitive) To have two or more things or properties that function together.
    Joe combines the intelligence of a rock with the honesty of a politician.
  3. (intransitive) To come together; to unite.
    two substances that easily combine
  4. (card games) In the game of casino, to play a card which will take two or more cards whose aggregate number of pips equals those of the card played.
  5. (obsolete) To bind; to hold by a moral tie.

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

combine (plural combines)

  1. A combine harvester
    We can't finish harvesting because our combine is stuck in the mud.
  2. A combination
    1. Especially, a joint enterprise of whatever legal form for a purpose of business or in any way promoting the interests of the participants, sometimes with monopolistic intentions.
      The telecom companies were accused of having formed an illegal combine in order to hike up the network charges.
    2. An industrial conglomeration in a socialist country, particularly in the former Soviet bloc.

TranslationsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

combine

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of combinar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of combinar

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviation of combinaison.

NounEdit

combine f (plural combines)

  1. (colloquial) trick, scheme

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

VerbEdit

combine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of combiner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of combiner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of combiner
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of combiner
  5. second-person singular imperative of combiner

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

combine

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of combinar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of combinar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of combinar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of combinar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

combine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of combinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of combinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of combinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of combinar.