Last modified on 14 June 2014, at 13:10

competence

See also: compétence

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French compétence.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

competence (countable and uncountable, plural competences)

  1. (uncountable) The quality or state of being competent, i.e. able or suitable for a general role.
    • 2005, Lies Sercu and Ewa Bandura, Foreign Language Teachers and Intercultural Competence: An International Investigation:
      Teachers are now required to teach intercultural communicative competence.
  2. (countable) The quality or state of being able or suitable for a particular task; the quality or state of being competent for a particular task.
    • 1961, National Council for Elementary Science (U.S.), Science Education:
      What professional competences do science teachers need?
  3. A sustainable income.
    • Alexander Pope
      Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, / Lie in three words — health, peace, and competence.
    • 1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, chapter 17
      “money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it. Beyond a competence, it can afford no real satisfaction, as far as mere self is concerned.”
  4. (countable) In law, the legal authority to deal with a matter.
    That question is out with the competence of this court and must be taken to a higher court.

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TranslationsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

  • competence” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.