connubial

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1650s, from Latin connūbiālis, from connūbium (marriage, wedlock) (variants of cōnūbiālis (pertaining to wedlock), from cōnūbium (marriage, wedlock)) from com- (together) (English com-) + nūbō (marry, to take as husband) (from which nubile)[1] from Proto-Indo-European *sneubho- (to marry, to wed).

AdjectiveEdit

connubial (comparative more connubial, superlative most connubial)

  1. Of or relating to the state of being married.

Usage notesEdit

Particularly used in fixed phrases, such as “connubial bliss”, “connubial love”, “connubial relations”, and “connubial bed”.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ connubial” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
Last modified on 19 March 2014, at 21:00