contiguous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin contiguus (touching), from contingere (to touch); see contingent, contact, contagion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kənˈtɪɡjuəs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: con‧tig‧u‧ous

AdjectiveEdit

contiguous (not comparable)

  1. connected; touching; abutting
  2. adjacent; neighbouring/neighboring
    • 1730–1774, Oliver Goldsmith, Introductory to Switzerland
      Though poor the peasant’s hut, his feasts though small,
      He sees his little lot the lot of all;
      Sees no contiguous palace rear its head
      To shame the meanness of his humble shed;
    • 1835, William Scoresby, Memorials of the Sea (page 59)
      [] the usual quietness of the day, with us, was broken in upon by the shout of success from the pursuing boats, followed by vehement respondings from the contiguous ship.
  3. connecting without a break
    The forty-eight contiguous states.
    • 1886, Frank Hamilton Cushing, A Study of Pueblo Pottery as Illustrative of Zuñi Culture Growth:
      Supposing three such houses to be contiguous to a central one, each separated from the latter by a straight wall.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 05:19