Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 10:14

conventionnel

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French conventionnel.

NounEdit

conventionnel (plural conventionnels)

  1. (French history) A member of the National Convention.
    • 1979, David P Jordan, The King's Trial, University of California 1979, p. 178:
      To calm their nerves and dispel the phantoms of their imaginations, the conventionnels proposed a series of fantastic draconian measures designed to insure tranquillity during the voting.
    • 2004, David Andress, The French Revolution and the People, London 2004, p. 236:
      When the crowds burst again into the assembly hall, they bore with them on a pike the head of a conventionnel, Féraud, who had tried to bar their path.
    • 2006, Howard G Brown, Ending the French Revolution, University of Virginia 2008, p. 27:
      The Conventionnels who had voted for the measure included many who had worked closely with deputies now under arrest for their part in the Terror.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From convention +‎ -el.

AdjectiveEdit

conventionnel m (feminine conventionnelle, masculine plural conventionnels, feminine plural conventionnelles)

  1. conventional

NounEdit

conventionnel m (plural conventionnels)

  1. (historical) conventionalist, conventionnel

External linksEdit