counthry

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

counthry (plural counthries)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of country.
    • 1871, James Fenimore Cooper, Wyandotte[1]:
      If ye've no relish for a fortification, in a time of war, ye've only to shoulther yer knapsack, and go out into the open counthry, where ye'll have all to yer own satisfaction.
    • 1902, M.E. Francis (Mrs. Francis Blundell), North, South and Over the Sea[2]:
      One crone raised herself sufficiently to remark that it was a fine thing for the counthry, glory be to God! which patriotic sentiment won a smile from Sister Louise, but failed to awaken much enthusiasm in any one else.
    • 1922, Gordon Casserly, The Jungle Girl[3]:
      I wish St. Pathrick had made a trip to India and dhriven the sarpints out av the counthry the same as he did in Ireland."
    • 1898, E. S. Ellis, Klondike Nuggets[4]:
      Ye have raiched the goold counthry, which, being the same, I rispictfully asks ye all to jine mesilf in letting out a hurrah which will make the town trimble and the payple open their eyes so wide that they won't git them shet agin for a wake to come.
Last modified on 17 November 2011, at 04:53