Last modified on 7 June 2014, at 01:42

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Gaelic.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

cran (plural crans or cran)

  1. (obsolete) a measure of herrings, either imprecise or sometimes legally specified; also rarely a barrel made to hold such a measure
    • 1800 Dec., Sir Richard Phillips, The Monthly magazine, Volume 10, No. 66, page 486:
      Very flattering indeed has been the success of the fishermen; and many boats have come in loaded, averaging thirty or forty crans each (every cran estimated at 1,000 herrings), and disposed of their cargoes at nine shillings per cran; but the price has been since raised to fifteen shillings.
    • 1960, Ewan MacColl, BBC radio ballad Singing the Fishing:
      [] And fish the knolls on the North Sea Holes
      And try your luck at the North Shields Gut
      With a catch of a hundred cran.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

cran (plural crans)

  1. (music) An embellishment played on the lowest note of a chanter of a bagpipe, consisting of a series of grace notes produced by rapid sequential lifting of the fingers of the lower hand.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From créner.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cran m (plural crans)

  1. notch
  2. (firearm) catch
  3. (belt) hole
  4. (hair) wave
  5. (colloquial) guts, bottle, courage

External linksEdit