Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 00:20

cumber

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English combren.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cumber (third-person singular simple present cumbers, present participle cumbering, simple past and past participle cumbered)

  1. (transitive, dated) To slow down, to hinder, to burden.
    • Dryden
      Why asks he what avails him not in fight, / And would but cumber and retard his flight?
    • John Locke
      The multiplying variety of arguments, especially frivolous ones, [] but cumbers the memory.
    • 1886, Sir Walter Scott, The Fortunes of Nigel. Pub.: Adams & Charles Black, Edinburgh; page 321:
      [] the base villain who murdered this poor defenceless old man, when he had not, by the course of nature, a twelvemonth's life in him, shall not cumber the earth long after him.

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ReferencesEdit

  • cumber” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).