Last modified on 25 September 2014, at 16:34

cursor

See also: Cursor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cursor (runner), from currō (run) + -or (agentive suffix). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cursor (plural cursors)

  1. A part of any of several scientific instruments that moves back and forth to indicate a position
  2. (graphical user interface) A moving icon or other representation of the position of the pointing device.
  3. (graphical user interface) An indicator, often a blinking line or bar, indicating where the next insertion or other edit will take place. Also referred to as "the caret".
  4. (databases) A reference to a row of data in a table, which moves from row to row as data is retrieved by way of it.
  5. (programming) A design pattern in object oriented methodology in which a collection is iterated uniformly, also known as the iterator pattern.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

cursor (third-person singular simple present cursors, present participle cursoring, simple past and past participle cursored)

  1. (intransitive, computing) To navigate by means of the cursor keys.
    • 1990, InfoWorld (volume 12, number 22, 28 May 1990)
      The only other problem is that there's a nagging tendency for the highlight to overrun when cursoring through file lists.

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From currō (run).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cursor m (genitive cursōris); third declension

  1. A runner, racer.
  2. A courier, messenger, post.
  3. A slave, who ran before the chariot of a grandee, forerunner.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cursor cursōrēs
genitive cursōris cursōrum
dative cursōrī cursōribus
accusative cursōrem cursōrēs
ablative cursōre cursōribus
vocative cursor cursōrēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cursor in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cursor.

NounEdit

cursor m (plural cursores)

  1. cursor