cut from the same cloth

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cut from the same cloth

  1. (idiomatic, of two or more persons or things) Very similar; possessing many of the same fundamental characteristics.
    • 1914, Julian Hawthorne, The Subterranean Brotherhood, ch. 6:
      [T]hese men are no more lost souls than we are—are, in fact, woven out of the same yarn and cut from the same cloth.
    • 1921, Gene Stratton-Porter, Her Father's Daughter, ch. 15:
      "Now ain't they jist the finest gentlemen?" said Katy. "Cut right off of a piece of the same cloth as your father."
    • 1997 Oct. 3, Stephen Holden, "Film Review: Casanova Complex," New York Times (retrieved 4 July 2011):
      Kiss the Girls, adapted from a novel by James Patterson, is cut from the same cloth as The Silence of the Lambs.
    • 2009 Jan. 6, Jeff Israely, "Rome Eyes Russian Orthodox Church Vote," Time:
      Kremlinologists and Vaticanisti are cut from the same cloth — fantastically adept at identifying the most important signs amid the smoke-and-mirrors maneuvering of their respective subjects.

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Last modified on 19 June 2013, at 11:52