cutis

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cutis (living skin)

NounEdit

cutis (plural cutes or cutises)

  1. (anatomy) The true skin or dermis, underlying the epidermis.
    • 1883: Alfred Swaine Taylor, Thomas Stevenson, The principles and practice of medical jurisprudence
      The cutis measures in thickness from a quarter of a line to a line and a half (a line is one-twelfth of an inch).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *kuH-t-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover). Cognates include Welsh cwd (scrotum), Lithuanian kutỹs (purse) and Old English hȳd (English hide). Related to obscūrus (dark, obscure) and culus (bottom).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cutis f (genitive cutis); third declension

  1. living skin
  2. rind, surface
  3. hide, leather

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cutis cutēs
genitive cutis cutium
dative cutī cutibus
accusative cutem cutēs
cutīs
ablative cute cutibus
vocative cutis cutēs
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:26