Last modified on 26 May 2014, at 18:14

cyberdeath

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

cyber- +‎ death

NounEdit

cyberdeath (uncountable)

  1. Virtual death taking place in cyberspace.
    • 1998, Margaret Morse, Virtualities: television, media art, and cyberculture
      That is why a virtual persona can be violated and why there is a relation between cyberdeath and psychic annihilation...
    • 2001, Jean Baudrillard, Chris Turner, Impossible exchange
      In a future civilization from which death has been eliminated, future clones might, perhaps, afford themselves the luxury of death, and become mortals once again in simulated form (cyberdeath).
    • 2001, Katherine M Ramsland, Cemetery Stories
      Cyberdeath: Through the Internet, you can watch a funeral live via Webcam, get your ashes scattered in space, contact a mortician, order a casket...
    • 2003, Richard Bliss, Lighthouse Rockets
      She and Henri had some kind of cyberdeath pact. If one didn't come back, the other one wouldn't. It was all very perverse, and confused.
    • 2004, Peter Revere, The Real 911: Truth and Testimony
      ...much of the electronic correspondence is gibberish that may circle the world for months at a time before a fitting cyberdeath arrives.
    • 2007, Jonathan Paul Marshall, Living on Cybermind
      And I was there when they returned to us — either from a long journey or beyond cyberdeath.