déraper

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French dialectal déraper (to tear at), from Occitan derapar, derrabar (to tear, uproot), from de- + rapar (to seize, remove), from Gothic *𐍂𐌰𐍀𐍉𐌽 (rapōn, to snatch, steal), from Proto-Germanic *hrapōną, *hrēpōną (to scratch, touch, pluck out, snatch), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kreb(h)-, *(s)kerb(h)- (to turn, bend, shrink), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Cognate with Old English hreppan (to touch, treat), Old Norse hreppa (to touch, grasp, receive). More at raffle.

VerbEdit

déraper

  1. to skid, to slide
  2. (of an anchor) to drag
  3. (figuratively) to get out of hand, to get out of control

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 29 January 2014, at 22:25