EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English daf, daffe (fool, idiot), from Old Norse daufr (deaf, stupid), from Proto-Germanic *daubaz (deaf, stunned), from Proto-Indo-European *dheubh- (to whisk, whirl, smoke, be obscure). Cognate with Swedish döf (deaf), Danish døv (deaf, stupid). More at deaf.

NounEdit

daff (plural daffs)

  1. A fool; an idiot; a blockhead.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English daffen (to render foolish), from daf, daffe (fool, idiot). See above.

VerbEdit

daff (third-person singular simple present daffs, present participle daffing, simple past and past participle daffed)

  1. (intransitive) To be foolish; make sport; play; toy.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
  2. (UK, dialect) To daunt.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grose to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Variant of doff.

VerbEdit

daff (third-person singular simple present daffs, present participle daffing, simple past and past participle daffed)

  1. (transitive) To toss aside; put off; doff.
  2. (transitive) To turn (someone) aside; divert.

Etymology 4Edit

From daffodil.

NounEdit

daff (plural daffs)

  1. (UK, informal) Short form of daffodil.
    Get your daffs here - £2 a bunch

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 2 August 2013, at 16:47