Last modified on 20 June 2014, at 12:57

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Representing a colloquial pronunciation of that, likely from African American vernacular.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

dat

  1. (slang or dialectal or nonstandard) that

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. (slang or dialectal or nonstandard) that

PronounEdit

dat

  1. (slang or dialectal or nonstandard) that

AdverbEdit

dat (not comparable)

  1. (slang or dialectal or nonstandard) that

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch dat, from Old Dutch that, from Proto-Germanic *þat, neuter form of Proto-Germanic *sa. Compare German das, English that.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

dat

  1. that (neuter); referring to a thing or a person further away.
    dat huis
    that house
    dat kind
    that child

DeclensionEdit

Dutch demonstrative determiners
Masculine/feminine Neuter Plural
Proximal deze dit deze
Distal die dat die


Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

dat n

  1. (demonstrative) that, that there
    Wat is dat?
    What is that?
  2. (relative) who, which, that
    Ik ken een meisje dat dat kan.
    I know a girl who can do that.

Usage notesEdit

This pronoun can combine with a preposition to form a pronominal adverb. When this occurs, it is changed into its adverbial/locative counterpart daar. See also Category:Dutch pronominal adverbs.

A preceding comma may alter the meaning of a clause starting with a relative pronoun. Compare the following sentences:

  • Het boek dat wit was, gaf ik terug
    I returned the book that was white. (specifically the white book, not another)
  • Het boek, dat wit was, gaf ik terug
    I returned the book, which was white. (it happened to be white)

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. that
    Ik zag dat het goed was.
    I saw that it was good.

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon that.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

dat n (definite article)

  1. the
    • Dat huus was trechtmakt.
    The house was finished.

AdjectiveEdit

dat n

  1. (demonstrative) that
    Ik mag dat book.
    I like that book.
    ...un dat schapp, weck ümmer leddig was.
    ...and that cabinet, which was always empty.

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. that

PronounEdit

dat

  1. (demonstrative) that

PronounEdit

dat n

  1. (relative) which, that

Usage notesEdit

  • Use as a relative pronoun may not exist in all dialects.

SynonymsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

German Low German and West Central German form of standard das, taken over into colloquial standard German.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dat

  1. (colloquial, nonstandard) Alternative form of das.
    Dat weiß ich nich'.
    I don't know that.
  2. (colloquial, nonstandard) Alternative form of dass.
    Ich glaub, dat der 'n bisschen übertreibt.
    I believe that he's exaggerating a little.

Usage notesEdit

Although found in the native dialects throughout northern and western Germany, the use of dat in colloquial standard German is most typical of the west (chiefly North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate). It is also heard in some parts of northern and north-eastern Germany, e.g. in and around Berlin. In all these regions, the forms dat and das are used in free variation.

ReferencesEdit


German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon that.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

dat n (definite article)

  1. the
    dat Huusthe house

AdjectiveEdit

dat n

  1. (demonstrative) that
    Ik mag dat Book.
    I like that book.

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. that
    Sęd ik, dat ik Kauken hęw?
    Did I say that I have cake?

PronounEdit

dat

  1. (demonstrative) that
    Kick di dat an!
    [Would you] look at that!

PronounEdit

dat n

  1. (relative) which, that
    dat Schipp, dat wi sailt hębben
    the ship that we have sailed

Usage notesEdit

  • Use as a relative pronoun may not exist in all dialects.

SynonymsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin datus.

NounEdit

dat m (plural dac)

  1. data
  2. fact

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dat

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

dat

  1. rafsi of drata.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German that, dat, a northern variety of daz, from Proto-Germanic *þat. Compare Dutch dat, Limburgish dat.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

dat n (unstressed d')

  1. neuter form of deen

DeclensionEdit

Luxembourgish definite articles
masculine feminine neuter plural
nom./acc. deen (den) déi (d') dat (d') déi (d')
dative deem (dem) där (der) deem (dem) deen (den)

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch that, from Proto-Germanic *þat.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dat n

  1. that, that one

DeterminerEdit

dat n

  1. that
  2. the

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: dat, het (the article)

Nigerian PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English that.

DeterminerEdit

dat

  1. that

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þat.

PronounEdit

dat

  1. (dated, dialectal) it; succeeded by det
    Dat varte ikkje lenge.
    It did not last long.
  2. (dated, dialectal) that; succeeded by det
    Dat vil eg ikkje segja deg.
    I will not tell you that.

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Bengali.

NounEdit

dat

  1. tooth

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Past participle of da, corresponding to Latin datus.

VerbEdit

dat (past participle of da)

  1. given
    mi-a dat cartea - he gave me the book

DeclensionEdit

See also nedat



TolaiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • da (when preceding a verb)

PronounEdit

dat

  1. First-person inclusive plural pronoun: you (many) and I, you (many) and me

DeclensionEdit



VolapükEdit

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. so that

West FrisianEdit

DeterminerEdit

dat

  1. that (neuter gender)

PronounEdit

dat

  1. that

ConjunctionEdit

dat

  1. that