Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 14:15

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

days

  1. plural form of day
  2. A particular time or period of vague extent.
    Things were more relaxed in Grandpa's days.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      In the old days, […], he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned. But he had then none of the oddities and mannerisms which I hold to be inseparable from genius, and which struck my attention in after days when I came in contact with the Celebrity.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      He read the letter aloud. Sophia listened with the studied air of one for whom, even in these days, a title possessed some surreptitious allurement.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      The [Washington] Post's proprietor through those turbulent [Watergate] days, Katharine Graham, held a double place in Washington’s hierarchy: at once regal Georgetown hostess and scrappy newshound, ready to hold the establishment to account. That is a very American position.
  3. Life.
    That's how he ended his days.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

days (comparative more days, superlative most days)

  1. During the day.
    She works days at the garage.

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

NounEdit

days

  1. plural form of day