Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 01:08

decuple

See also: décuple

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French décuple, from Late Latin decuplus (tenfold), from Latin decem (ten), and plico (fold).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decuple (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) tenfold

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

decuple (plural decuples)

  1. (archaic) An amount multiplied by ten.
    • 1842, Jacob Reese Eckfeldt; William Ewing Du Bois, A manual of gold and silver coins of all nations, struck within ..., page 89:
      The gold coin of the law of 1818 is of four denominations; the decuple of 30 ducats, the half-decuple, ...

VerbEdit

decuple (third-person singular simple present decuples, present participle decupling, simple past and past participle decupled)

  1. (archaic) To multiply by ten.
    • 2004, Mark Collier; Stephen Quirke, Annette Imhausen, The UCL Lahun papyri: religious, literary, legal, mathematical and ..., volume 1209:
      The multiplications on this fragment show four of the basic techniques used by the Egyptian scribe in performing calculations: doubling, halving, decupling, and "taking two-thirds".

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Chambers's Etymological Dictionary, 1896, p. 114

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decuple f

  1. feminine plural of decuplo

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decuple

  1. vocative masculine singular of decuplus