deep pockets

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

deep pockets (normally plural, singular deep pocket)

  1. (idiomatic) An ample supply of money, especially money which one is willing to spend; the possessor of such money.
    • 1959, "The Biggest Fund," Time, 21 Dec.,
      Out of deep pockets in three weeks flowed 18 six-figure gifts totaling $3,100,000.
    • 1989, V. Hans and M. Ermann, "Responses to Corporate versus Individual Wrongdoing," Law and Human Behavior, vol. 13, no. 2, p. 153,
      It is commonly claimed that juries award plaintiffs who sue corporations larger sums of money because the jurors believe that the corporations, with their "deep pockets," can afford more.
    • 2003, Jeffrey Manns, "Insuring against Terror?" The Yale Law Journal, vol. 112, no. 8, p. 2529,
      The federal government was the one party with the deep pockets to meet the rent-seeking needs of insurers and high-risk property owners.
Last modified on 19 June 2013, at 14:18