Last modified on 26 May 2014, at 18:35

deep pockets

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

deep pockets (normally plural, singular deep pocket)

  1. (idiomatic) An ample supply of money, especially money which one is willing to spend; the possessor of such money.
    • 1959 Dec. 21, "The Biggest Fund," Time:
      Out of deep pockets in three weeks flowed 18 six-figure gifts totaling $3,100,000.
    • 1989, V. Hans and M. Ermann, "Responses to Corporate versus Individual Wrongdoing," Law and Human Behavior, vol. 13, no. 2, p. 153:
      It is commonly claimed that juries award plaintiffs who sue corporations larger sums of money because the jurors believe that the corporations, with their "deep pockets," can afford more.
    • 2003, Jeffrey Manns, "Insuring against Terror?" The Yale Law Journal, vol. 112, no. 8, p. 2529:
      The federal government was the one party with the deep pockets to meet the rent-seeking needs of insurers and high-risk property owners.