Last modified on 9 August 2014, at 11:26

defensive

See also: défensive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French défensif

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

defensive (comparative more defensive, superlative most defensive)

  1. Intended for defence; protective.
    a defensive perimeter
  2. Intended to deter attack.
    a defensive missile system
  3. Performed so as to minimise risk.
    defensive driving
  4. Displaying an inordinate sensitivity to criticism.
  5. (cricket) Of a bowling or fielding tactic designed to prevent the other side from scoring runs; of a batting tactic designed to prevent being out.
  6. (sports) Pertaining to defense, as opposed to attack.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, BBC:
      The Italian opted for Bolton's Cahill alongside captain John Terry - and his decision was rewarded with a goal after only 13 minutes. Bulgaria gave a hint of defensive frailties to come when they failed to clear Young's corner, and when Gareth Barry found Cahill in the box he applied the finish past Nikolay Mihaylov.
  7. In a state or posture of defense.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

defensive (plural defensives)

  1. A means, attitude or position of defense.
    • 2007 May 26, Julia Werdigier, “Consolidating the Banks of Europe”, New York Times:
      Such kinds of defensives are really rather protecting the local companies than the consumers.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

defensive

  1. inflected form of defensiv

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dēfensive

  1. vocative masculine singular of dēfensivus